SHSM Policy and Implementation Guide – Manufacturing
Specialist High Skills Majors

SHSM Policy and Implementation Guide – Manufacturing

The SHSM in manufacturing provides students with a strong foundation for a wide variety of careers in the manufacturing sector, from those focusing on the service, repair, and modification of vehicles and vehicle systems to those related to the organization and management of manufacturing services and mass-transit systems.

TOOLS AND RESOURCES

For local labour market opportunities in the sector, see your local SHSM contact at the board office.

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INSIGHT

The requirements of this SHSM are unique and are geared to the manufacturing sector. However, the design of all SHSM programs follows a consistent model, described in Section A: Policy.

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Required Components for the SHSM–Manufacturing

The SHSM–Manufacturing has the following five required components:

1. A bundle of nine Grade 11 and Grade 12 credits

These credits make up the bundle:

  • four manufacturing major credits that provide sector-specific knowledge and skills. The four courses must include at least one Grade 11 and one Grade 12 credit, and may include one cooperative education credit related to the sector. (This cooperative education credit would be additional to the two that are required in the bundle; see below);
  • three other required credits from the Ontario curriculum, in each of which some expectations must be met through a contextualized learning activity (CLA) for the manufacturing sector. The three credits include:
    • one in English;1
    • one in mathematics; and
    • one of the following:
      • for the apprenticeship training, college, and university pathways – one in science (or a cooperative education credit related to the sector, which would be additional to the two cooperative education credits required in the bundle; see below);
      • for the workplace pathway – an additional credit in English (Grade 12)
    • two cooperative education credits that provide authentic learning experiences in a workplace setting, enabling students to refine, extend, apply, and practise sector-specific knowledge and skills

    1. Note that a compulsory English credit is required in Grade 11 and in Grade 12 for graduation with an OSSD. Schools may determine whether the CLA, required for the SHSM bundle of credits, is completed in the Grade 11 or Grade 12 English course.

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    See Section A1.2 for more on SHSM credits.



    Credits
    Apprenticeship Training
    Grades 11–12

    College
    Grades 11–12

    University
    Grades 11–12

    Workplace
    Grades 11–12
    Major Credits
    One credit may be substituted with a cooperative education credit (additional to the 2 required co-op credits)
    4
    Including at least
    one Gr. 11 and
    one Gr. 12 credit
    4
    Including at least
    one Gr. 11 and
    one Gr. 12 credit
    4
    Including at least
    one Gr. 11 and
    one Gr. 12 credit
    4
    Including at least
    one Gr. 11 and
    one Gr. 12 credit
    English including a CLA 1 1 1 2
    One credit must be in Gr. 12
    Mathematics including a CLA 1 1 1 1
    Science including a CLA
    May be sustituted with 1 cooperative education credit (additional to the 2 required co-op credits)
    1 1 1 not required
    Cooperative Education 2 2 2 2
    Total number of credits 9 9 9 9

    2. Sector-recognized certifications and/or training courses/programs

    This SHSM sector requires students to complete a specified number of compulsory and elective sector-recognized certifications and/or training courses/programs, as indicated in the following table. NOTE: Where an item in the table is capitalized, it is the proper name of the specific certification or training course/program that is appropriate for the SHSM. Where an item is lowercased, it is the name of an area, type, or category of training for which specific certifications or training courses/programs should be selected by the school or board. The requirements are summarized in the table below.

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    See Section A1.3 for more on SHSM certifications and training.

    Three (3) compulsory
    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Level C – includes automated external defibrillation (AED) Standard First Aid Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) – generic (i.e., not site-specific) instruction
    Three (3) electives from the list below
    basic electrical safety Basic Safety Orientation (BSO Plus) Canadian Welding Bureau (CWB) – flat computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)
    confined space awareness customer service elevated work platforms fall protection
    fire safety and fire extinguisher use handling dangerous substances health and safety – basic hoisting and rigging
    Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship (ICE) leadership skills Lean Manufacturing lockout/tagging
    personal protective equipment – manufacturing portfolio development project management propane safety
    safe lifting scaffold safety sector-specific vehicle operation and safety sector-specific software 1
    specialized skills training program/competition (e.g., Skills Canada provincial level) transportation of dangerous goods Working at Heights  

    3. Experiential learning and career exploration activities

    Experiential learning and career exploration opportunities relevant to the sector might include the following:

    • one-on-one observation of a cooperative education student at a placement in the manufacturing sector (an example of job twinning)
    • a day-long observation of a skilled tradesperson in the manufacturing sector (an example of job shadowing)
    • a one- or two-week work experience with a member of an industry association or a professional in the sector (an example of work experience)
    • participation in a local, provincial, or national Skills Canada competition
    • a tour of a range of manufacturing enterprises
    • attendance at a manufacturing trade show, conference, or job fair
    • attendance at demonstrations and hands-on activities presented by equipment vendors
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    See Section A1.4 for more on experiential learning and career exploration activities.

    POLICY

    Note that volunteer activities in an SHSM cannot be counted towards the hours of community involvement required to earn the OSSD.

    Policy icon

    4. Reach ahead experiences

    Students are provided one or more reach ahead experiences – opportunities to take the next steps along their chosen pathway – as shown in the following examples:

    • Apprenticeship: visiting an approved apprenticeship delivery agent in the sector
    • College: interviewing a college student enrolled in a sector-specific program
    • University: observing a university class in a sector-related program
    • Workplace: interviewing an employee in the sector
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    See Section A1.5 for more on reach ahead experiences.

    5. Essential Skills and work habits and the Ontario Skills Passport (OSP)

    Students will develop Essential Skills and work habits required in the sector and document them using the OSP, a component of the SHSM.

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    See Section A1.6 for more on Essential Skills and work habits.

    Pathways for the SHSM–Manufacturing

    See the table illustrating the four pathways and required credits leading to completion of this SHSM.

    TOOLS AND RESOURCES

    Visit the ministry's SHSM website for related resources.

    Tools and Resources icon

    Awareness building (Grades 7 and 8)

    See Section B3.4 for information on building awareness of SHSM programs among students in Grades 7 and 8.

    Exploration (Grades 9 and 10)

    See Section B3.4 for information on providing Grade 9 and 10 students with opportunities for exploration of SHSM programs. In addition, students considering this SHSM can be encouraged to enrol in the following courses to become better informed about careers and postsecondary options in the sector:

    • Exploring Technologies: This Grade 9 course is recommended for all students following SHSM pathways that have a technological education focus. The course provides students with opportunities to explore a variety of technologies, including manufacturing technology, by engaging in activities related to them.
    • Career Studies (compulsory) and Discovering the Workplace: Some of the expectations in these Grade 10 courses provide opportunities for students to explore occupations and other postsecondary options in the sector and to participate in experiential learning activities.
    • Manufacturing Technology (TMJ2O): This course is recommended for any Grade 10 student who is considering enrolling in an SHSM–Manufacturing program.

    Specialization (Grades 11 and 12)

    Students acquire the sector-specific knowledge and technical skills required to earn their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with an SHSM–Manufacturing by completing its five required components. Students and their parents/guardians are encouraged to consult with guidance counsellors and teachers to select the courses that will enable students to pursue their goals.

    Manufacturing sector representatives have identified knowledge of entrepreneurship and basic business practices as important for students as they prepare for careers in this sector. Therefore, it is recommended that in Grade 11 or 12 students do one of the following:

    • complete an entrepreneurship course offered in the Ontario business studies curriculum
    • pursue an extracurricular activity focused on entrepreneurship (e.g., Junior Achievement's Company Program)

    Students pursuing an apprenticeship pathway should consider the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), which enables them to start an apprenticeship while earning their OSSD.

    Students pursuing a university pathway are advised to complete their required cooperative education credits in Grade 11, in order to allow room in their timetables in Grade 12 for credits needed to meet university entrance requirements.

    When helping students plan their SHSMs, particularly with respect to the selection of courses to fulfil the requirement for credits in the major, teachers should bear in mind that technological education courses can be offered as single-credit or multiple-credit courses.

    Program Pathways: SHSM–Manufacturing

    This template shows program requirements for the SHSM–Manufacturing in Grades 11 and 12, along with some of the additional credits needed for an OSSD. It is provided to help guide students in choosing the credits they need to meet the SHSM requirements in the pathway of their choice. Students should always review their pathways plan with their parents/guardians and their teachers to ensure that they have all the credits they need to graduate with an SHSM–Manufacturing.

    • Shaded boxes represent required credits in the bundle for the SHSM–Manufacturing.
    • (C) represents a compulsory credit for the OSSD.
    • The SHSM bundle of credits must include two cooperative education credits, but may include a maximum of four. The possible options are noted below, and explained fully in Section A1.2 of this guide.
    Apprenticeship Training Pathway
    Specialization
    Grades 11–12
    College Pathway
    Specialization
    Grades 11–12
    University Pathway
    Specialization
    Grades 11–12
    Workplace Pathway
    Specialization
    Grades 11–12
    1 English credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 English credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 English credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    2 English credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 math credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 math credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 math credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 math credit (C)*
    (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)
    1 science credit*
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted.
    1 science credit*
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted.
    1 science credit*
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted.
    not required
    4 manufacturing major credits (including a Gr. 11 and a Gr. 12 credit)
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted for one of these four credits.
    4 manufacturing major credits (including a Gr. 11 and a Gr. 12 credit)
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted for one of these four credits.
    4 manufacturing major credits (including a Gr. 11 and a Gr. 12 credit)
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted for one of these four credits.
    4 manufacturing major credits (including a Gr. 11 and a Gr. 12 credit)
    A cooperative education credit related to the sector may be substituted for one of these four credits.
    2 cooperative education credits related to the sector (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)**
    May be used as (C) credits
    2 cooperative education credits related to the sector (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)**
    May be used as (C) credits
    2 cooperative education credits related to the sector (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)**
    May be used as (C) credits
    2 cooperative education credits related to the sector (in either Gr. 11 or Gr. 12)**
    May be used as (C) credits
    2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 11) 2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 11) 2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 11) 2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 11)
    2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 12) 2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 12) 2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 12) 2 optional or compulsory credits (Gr. 12)

    * A contextualized learning activity (CLA) must be included in the course. (Note that students must take Grade 11 and Grade 12 English to graduate with an OSSD, but schools may choose to offer the CLA in either grade.)

    ** May be taken the summer before Grade 11

    Note: To guide students and teachers in the development of their SHSM program, schools can access the latest approved SHSM course list for each sector through their SHSM board lead.

    Occupations in the Manufacturing Sector

    The following table provides examples of occupations in the justice, community safety, and emergency services sector, with corresponding National Occupational Classification (NOC) codes, sorted according to the type of postsecondary education or training the occupations would normally require.

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    See Section A1.6 for more on occupations and NOC codes.

    Apprenticeship Training College
    • Die Designer 2232
    • Electrician 7212
    • Electrician, Plant Maintenance 7242
    • Industrial Instrument Mechanic 2243
    • Millwright - Industrial 7311
    • Mould Maker 7231
    • Precision Machinist 7231
    • Precision Metal Fabricator 7263
    • Roll Grinder/Turner 9511
    • Tool and Cutter Grinder 9511
    • Tool and Die Maker 7232
    • Welder 7265
    • Welder fitter 7265
    • Buyer 1225
    • Chemical Production Engineer Techonologist 2211
    • Design and Drafting Technologist 2253
    • Electronics Engineering Technologist and Technician 2241
    • Intrumentation and Control Technologist and Technician 2243
    • Inventory Analyst 1474
    • Manufacturing Technician/Technologist 2233
    • Materials Supervisor/Material Control Manager 0114
    • Mechanical Engineering Technologist 2232
    • Photonics Technologist and Technician 2241
    • Production and Quality Control Technologist 2233
    • Stationary Engineer 7351
    • Technical Sales Specialist 6221
    University Workplace
    • Chemical Engineer 2134
    • Electrical Engineer 2133
    • Engineer, Computer Integrated Manufacturing 2141
    • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineer 2141
    • Mechanical Engineer 2132
    • Metallurgical Engineer 2142
    • Production Engineer 2141
    • Foundry Worker 9412
    • Inventory Clerk 1474
    • Labourer, Material Handling 7452
    • Machine Operator, Metal Machining 9511
    • Motor Vehicle Assembler 9482
    • Solderer 7265

    Note: This information is based on the 2006 NOC. An update to the NOC in 2011 resulted in changes to the codes and titles for many occupations, and in some cases to the occupations included in the group. For more detail, refer to the NOC website. Ontario Job Futures uses information based on the 2006 NOC. (Note also that some of the names of occupations listed here reflect common usage in the sector and may differ slightly from those used in the NOC system.)

    Postsecondary Programs and Training in the Manufacturing Sector

    The following are examples of programs and training related to careers in the manufacturing sector and the accreditations associated with each.

    Apprenticeship Training
    Construction Boilermaker Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    General Machinist Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Industrial Maintenance Mechanic Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Machine Tool Builder and Integrator Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Machinist Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Mechanical Millwright Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Millwright Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Mould Maker Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Precision Metal Fabricator Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Sheet Metal Worker Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Steamfitter Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification
    Welder Certificate of apprenticeship/certificate of qualification

     

    College
    Industrial Engineering Technology – Management Diploma
    Industrial Management Diploma
    Integrated Manufacturing Systems Diploma
    Manufacturing Engineering Technology Diploma
    Mechanical CAD/CAM Technician – Automated Machining Diploma
    Mechanical Engineering Technician Diploma
    Mechanical Engineering Technology Diploma
    Mechanical Technician – Tool Making Diploma
    Process Automation Bachelor's degree

     

    University
    Industrial Engineering Bachelor's degree
    Industrial Engineering - Automotive Manufacturing Systems Engineering Bachelor's degree
    Manufacturing Engineering Bachelor's degree
    Manufacturing Engineering and Management Bachelor's degree
    Mechanical Engineering – Manufacturing, Controls, Automation, and Robotics Bachelor's degree

     

    Training for the Workplace
    Flux Cored Arc Welding (Manufacturing) Certificate
    Gas Metal Arc Welding (Manufacturing) Certificate
    Good Manufacturing Proccesses Certificate
    Manufacturing Techniques Certificate
    Manufacturing Techniques – Wood Products Certificate
    Mechanical Techniques – CNC/CAD/CAM Specialist Certificate
    Mechanical Techniques – Design Certificate
    Mechanical Techniques – Manufacturing Certificate
    Welder Operator Manufacturing Certificate
    Welding Techniques Certificate