Estimates Briefing Book 2015-2016

Part I: Estimates Briefing Book 2015-16


Table of Contents

Ministry Financial Information

Appendix:

Previous Results-Based Plans:


ISSN # 2369-1905

MINISTRY OVERVIEW

Mandate

Creating New Opportunities for Our Future

Ontario's publicly funded early years and education system is recognized as one of the best in the world, and the ministry is committed to making it even better.

The Ministry of Education will continue to focus on student achievement and well-being by providing students with the best possible publicly funded education. The ministry is also working to modernize and build a child care and early years system that is high quality, seamless and more responsive to parents' needs.

In the years to come, Ontario's publicly funded education system will move from great to excellent by ensuring our young people have the learning and skills they need to lead in the global economy.

By 2025, Ontario will have an early years and education system that seamlessly integrates services from early years to adulthood. Ontario will be a world leader in higher-order skills — such as critical thinking and problem solving — which will allow Ontario to thrive in the increasingly competitive global marketplace.

Ministry Contribution to Priorities and Results

Renewed Vision: Achieving Excellence

In April 2014, the ministry released its renewed vision, Achieving Excellence: A Renewed Vision for Education in Ontario.

This vision builds on the progress and successes of the last 10 years. And it focuses on both learners and educators through four renewed goals:

  • Achieving excellence
  • Ensuring equity
  • Promoting well-being
  • Enhancing public confidence.

Renewed Goals

The ministry's renewed goals for the early years and education system are:

Achieving Excellence: Children and students of all ages will achieve high levels of academic performance, acquire valuable skills and demonstrate good citizenship. Educators will be supported in learning continuously and will be recognized as among the best in the world.

Ensuring Equity: All children and students will be inspired to reach their full potential, with access to rich learning experiences that begin at birth and continue into adulthood.

Promoting Well-Being: All children and students will develop enhanced mental and physical health, a positive sense of self and belonging, and the skills to make positive choices.

Enhancing Public Confidence: Ontarians will continue to have confidence in a publicly funded education system that helps develop new generations of confident, capable and caring citizens.

Implementing the Renewed Vision for Education

For the next several years, the ministry's top priority will be to implement Achieving Excellence: A Renewed Vision for Education in Ontario.

The Ministry of Education is investing in the early years and the education system to build a strong workforce, a vibrant economy and a bright future for the province's children.

Highlights of 2014-15 Achievements

  • Since 2003-04, the province has doubled funding for child care to more than $1 billion annually.
  • Since 2003, licensed spaces in child care centres have increased by more than 130,000.
  • Full-day kindergarten is now fully implemented and available to all four- and five-year-olds in Ontario.
  • In 2013-14, 72 per cent of Grades 3 and 6 students met or exceeded the provincial standard in the EQAO assessments of student performance in reading, writing and mathematics. This is an increase of 18 percentage points from 54 per cent in 2002-03.
  • In 2013-14, 84 per cent of students graduated from high school, compared to just 68 per cent in 2003-04 — a 16 percentage point increase.

Going Forward: Short-Term Results

  • Continue progress toward the goals of an 85 percent graduation rate and 75 per cent student success rate on EQAO assessments, with a particular emphasis on increased achievement in mathematics.
  • Elevate recognition that to achieve academic success requires a focus on the whole child — their cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development.
  • Continue implementation of Ontario First Nations, Métis and Inuit Education Policy Framework and targeted strategies to improve the achievement of Aboriginal students and close achievement gaps.
  • Continue focus on strategies and initiatives that close the achievement gap and improve the well-being of Children and Youth In Care, including a joint protocol to guide the working relationships of school boards and Children's Aid Societies, better data and reporting on educational outcomes.
  • Modernize child care through increased transparency, accountability and enhanced quality.
  • Transition family support programs to Best Start Child and Family Centres which builds on full day kindergarten and is part of the government's plan to deliver more convenient and seamless supports and services to children and their families.
  • Continue Year 2 of the School Board Efficiencies and Modernization Strategy implementation which encourages school boards to improve the delivery of education in Ontario and promotes more efficient use of school space.

Going Forward: Medium-Term Results

  • Continue to implement School Board Efficiency and Modernization with the next phase of funding changes to incent school boards to right-size their capital foot printand modernize other grant lines. This includes providing capital funding to promote the consolidation of school facilities, where appropriate.
  • In concert with the Premier's Advisory Panel on Community Hubs, continue to implement community hubs by enhancing the existing policies that support the creation of Community Hubs and provide some supports to boards to use some empty school space across the province for community resources.
  • Continue the focus on well-being by collaborating and partnering across all levels of government in order to build coherence, greater integration and alignment in support of child and youth well-being.
  • Modernize the School Facility Inventory System to better manage the government's largest building asset portfolio ($54 billion) and improve the capital funding tracking and allocation process.

Going Forward: Long-Term Results

  • Further develop mathematics content knowledge and pedagogical practices for elementary teachers and principals.
  • Evolve pedagogical practices by extending the principles of inquiry-based learning from kindergarten into elementary learning.
  • Improve supports and tools for career planning.
  • Expand learning opportunities outside the classroom through experiential learning opportunities and providing innovative K-12 learning management system/virtual environments that supports online and blended learning.
  • Continue to provide adequate capital funding to support the renewal and repair of existing schools to achieve a state of good repair and provide continued investments for the construction of new schools.

Alignment of Programs with the Government's Priorities

The key results achieved, as well as the ministry's short, medium and long-term objectives, support the ministry's mandate, and align with the government's broader priorities.

The below chart outlines key government priorities that the ministry directly supports through its range of services and supports.

Government Priority Ministry of Education Responsibilities
Increased talent and skills among Ontarians
  • Full Day Kindergarten (FDK)
  • Elementary Education (Gr. 1—8)
  • Secondary Education (Gr. 9—12)
  • School Operating Supports
  • Aboriginal Education Supports
  • Adult and Continuing Education
  • Equity and Achieving Outcomes
  • Language Supports
  • Leadership & Governance
  • Promoting Student Well-Being and Reducing Risks
  • Agencies Educational Programming (TVO — TFO)
  • Agencies Educational Assessment (EQAO)
Reduced poverty, inequality and exclusion
  • Child Care
  • Family Support Programs
  • Provincial Schools and Demonstration Schools
  • Supports for Students with Special Education Needs
Modernized infrastructure and transportation networks
  • School Board Capital
Improve Retirement Security
  • Teachers' Pension Plan (TPP)
Other Public Interest
  • Student Transportation

Ministry Programs and Activities

Full-Day Kindergarten

The Full-Day Kindergarten program provides funding for full-day learning to improve children's success in school in reading, writing and math in Grade 1. The program also provides targeted funding to support kindergarten, such as Early Years Leads, which provide high quality programs and system leadership. Performance measures include the Early Development Instrument (EDI) — a population-based measure of children's developmental health and well-being at school entry in Grade 1.

Elementary Education (Grades 1 to 8)

The Elementary Education program provides for the core education requirements of every student in Grades 1 to 8 and covers the cost of a classroom education, including: teachers and education support staff; classroom supplies, textbooks, learning materials and computers; guidance and library services; and supports to improve educational outcomes for students. Performance measures include Board Improvement Plans for Student Achievement (BIPSA) and School Improvement Plans for Student Achievement (SIPSA).

Secondary Education (Grades 9 to 12)

The Secondary Education program provides for the core education requirements of every student in Grades 9 to 12 and covers the cost of a classroom education, including: teachers and education support staff; classroom supplies, textbooks, learning materials and computers; guidance and library services; and supports to improve educational outcomes for students. Performance measures include student success indicators and program outcomes, such as the secondary graduation rate, credit accumulation, pass rates, and mathematics and literacy achievement on EQAO assessments.

School Operating Supports

This program supports the daily operations and maintenance of schools. The program provides funding for school leadership, custodial staff and supplies and utilities, as well as supports for the community use of schools, for remote, rural and small communities, schools with declining enrolment and funding for the remaining school authorities. Performance measures include facilities data collected from school boards, on-the-ground facility capacity data and facility level enrolment. This data is used to assess overall facility utilization rates and the efficient use of space.

Aboriginal Education Supports

This program provides funding for the First Nations, Métis and Inuit Education Supplement and supports programs designed for Aboriginal students as outlined in the Ontario First Nation, Métis, and Inuit Education Policy Framework. Annual funding is provided outside the GSN to support the implementation of the Ontario First Nation, Métis, and Inuit Education Policy Framework and to improve student achievement and well-being and close the achievement gap between Aboriginal students and all students. Performance measures include attendance rates of Aboriginal students and the percentage of Aboriginal students meeting provincial standards on province-wide assessments (EQAO) in reading, writing, and mathematics.

Adult and Continuing Education

The Adult and Continuing Education program provides funding support for continuing education, summer/night school, adult day school (age 21+), International Languages Elementary and Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) for mature students.

Performance measures include indicators for the reduction in courses needed to earn the OSSD through effective use of PLAR and completion rates leading to a reduction in repeated courses.

Equity and Achieving Outcomes

The Equity and Achieving Outcomes program fosters equitable and inclusive learning environments and helps ensure that the supports provided are focused and targeted for the students who need it most, regardless of their circumstance. Performance measures include dual credit success rates that help to close the gap between attempted vs. achieved credits.

Language Supports

The Language Support program provides funding support for French as a First Language (FFL) Allocation, French as a Second Language (FSL) Allocation, English as a Second Language (ESL) and English Literacy Development (ELD) Allocation, Programme d'appui aux nouveaux arrivants (PANA) Allocation, Actualisation linguistique en français (ALF) Allocation, and Funding to support initiatives for delivering French-language education in minority settings as well as second official language education. Performance measures include student participation and performance in language programming.

Leadership & Governance

The Leadership and Governance program at the school board level supports the goals of achieving excellence in teaching and learning and enhancing confidence in publicly funded education, as well as the government priority of increasing talent and skills among Ontarians. Performance measures include the requirements for all school boards to submit balanced budgets.

Promoting Student Well-being and Reducing Risks

The Promoting Well-being and Reducing Risk program aims to support the whole child development (i.e., cognitive, emotional, social, physical) by developing enhanced mental and physical health, a positive sense of self and belonging, and the skills to make positive choices, regardless of individual circumstances. Performance measures include student participation rates in long-term suspension programs and student participation in extracurricular activities.

Agencies Educational Programming (TVO and TFO)

TVO is Ontario's public educational media organization and provides interactive educational content. TFO offers French-language multimedia resources for students from pre-school to university.

Agencies Educational Assessment (EQAO)

The Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) tests student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics in relation to the Ontario curriculum. Performance measures include the quality and integrity of the assessments and reporting on results in a way that reflects the quality and accountability of Ontario's education system.

Child Care

The Child Care program provides supports for the costs associated with child care, including child care spaces, licensing and enforcement as well as supports for fee subsidies, wages, capacity building and special needs children. Performance measures include measures for assessing quality and access for licensed child care and year-over-year change in licensed child care spaces, number of licences and subsidies.

Family Support Programs

Family Support Programs assists parents and families in their role as primary caregivers and encourages them to be a part of their children's early learning experience. These programs provide children with opportunities to learn, socialize and prepare to start school, provide information to parents about programs and services and support children and families in high-risk communities. Performance measures include measures for assessing the rates and frequency of child and family participation in family support programs in the province.

Provincial Schools and Demonstration Schools

The Provincial and Demonstration Schools program provides educational supports for Ontario students and children who are deaf, blind, deafblind or have severe learning disabilities through the direct operation of five provincial and four demonstration schools. The program also provides pre-school services for deaf children (birth to school age) and their families and consultative services and alternative educational resources for boards and institutions with students with perceptual disabilities. Performance measures include indicators for students graduating with an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) or Certificate of Achievement (CoA) or recognition of "school leavers".

Supports for Students with Special Education Needs

Supports for Students with Special Education Needs improve equity, access, achievement and well-being of students with special education needs, through increased school board capacity to deliver special education programs and services. The Ministry provides funding to district school boards to deliver special education programs, services and/or equipment to students with special education needs. Performance measures include indicators for the number of students receiving special education programs and services, the number of individual education plans developed and the number of students assessed by an Identification, Placement and Review Committee.

School Board Capital

The School Boards Capital program include funding supports for renewal and renovations at existing schools, construction of new schools, investments to support the implementation of full-day kindergarten and child-care infrastructure. Performance measures include the utilization of school space, the improvement of facility conditions and the use of temporary accommodation to address growth.

Teacher's Pension Plan

The Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan (OTPP) Board is a joint sponsorship between the province and the Ontario Teachers' Federation members under which responsibility for OTPP's financial surpluses and shortfalls are shared. The Province's cash contributions to the plan match the contributions made by members of the plan working in the publicly funded education system. Performance measures include a quality service index and financial sustainability.

Student Transportation

Through the Student Transportation Grant, the ministry provides funding to school boards to support safe, effective and efficient transportation services of students across the province, including transporting students with special education needs.

Investing in Ontario's Future

Education is one of the most valued public services.

To build Ontario's economy, its people and communities must succeed. The ministry is working with its partners to build opportunity today, and secure the future for all Ontarians.

A few key investments are listed below. This list is not meant to be exhaustive. For more information on ministry investments, please visit the education funding page on the ministry website.

Investments

  • The 2015-16 Grants for Student needs is projected to be stable at $22.5 billion, a provincial average of $11,451 per pupil.
  • The 2015-16 grants continue the modernization of education funding with forward thinking changes that are necessary for delivering on the vision's promise of Achieving Excellence.
  • As a result of extensive consultations with our partners, we have worked to modernize the system and find efficiencies. This year's education budget is more focused than ever on directly supporting students and their experience in the classroom, rather than supporting under utilized school space.
  • At the same time, the government continues to provide additional funding to help school boards manage increases in commodity prices (natural gas, facility insurance and other costs), electricity and transportation costs.
  • School boards are also being provided with $214.1 million in funding outside of the GSN for various programs and initiatives that support student achievement.
  • Since 2003, Ontario has invested $12.9 billion in school infrastructure, including nearly 725 new schools and over 700 additions and renovations.
  • In 2014, the ministry announced a $750 million capital investment over four years to support school boards in consolidating schools to reduce excess capacity.
  • An investment of $1.25 billion in capital funding to support improving the condition of schools is being made over three years, starting with the 2014-15 school year.
  • To date, over $1.5 billion has been allocated in capital funding to support the implementation of full-day kindergarten. This funding has been used to support the creation of close to 3,500 new kindergarten classrooms through additions and major retrofits.
  • In 2015, we're providing over $1 billion in child care funding to 47 municipalities. This is an increase of $44.5 million, or approximately 4.5 per cent over last year.
  • As well, the ministry is investing $269 million over three years to support a wage enhancement in the licensed child care sector for our lower-paid early childhood educators.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

This image is the Ministry of Education organizational chart, May 7, 2015

Organizational Chart description


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AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS (ABCs)
AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS* 2015/16
Expenditure Estimates
$
2014/15
Expenditure Interim Actuals
$
2013/14
Expenditure Actuals
$
Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO)
Operating Expense44,866,30044,889,20044,866,440
Capital Expense1,600,0001,600,0001,600,000
L'Office des télécommunications éducatives de langue française de l'Ontario (TFO)
Operating Expense24,793,70024,793,70024,484,700
Capital Expense1,000,0001,000,0001,000,000
Education Quality and Accountability Office31,282,10032,077,10032,077,100
Provincial Schools Authority30,100 -15,502
Minister's Advisory Council on Special Education75,00030,87840,717
Curriculum Council20,000 -17,407

* Not including consolidation adjustments

The ministry is responsible for the following classified agencies:

Operational Enterprise Agencies:

Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO)

TVO is Ontario's publicly funded educational media organization. TVO provides high-quality English-language educational programming and services through broadcast, distance education, and interactive web access. Distance education for secondary school credit is provided through the Independent Learning Centre. TVO is governed by the Ontario Educational Communications Authority Act. Its broadcast licence is governed by the federal Broadcasting Act and CRTC licensing.

Office des télécommunications éducatives de langue française de l'Ontario (TFO)

The Ontario French-language Educational Communications Authority (TFO) produces and broadcasts multimedia quality educational and cultural content; produces and distributes supporting complementary products, according to the needs and aspirations of the target audience. Therefore TFO contributes to the civic and cultural fulfillment of the Ontario French community and makes accessible to them a wide range of products on various multimedia platforms.

Operational Service Agencies:

Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO)

EQAO is responsible for ensuring greater accountability in and enhancing the quality of education in Ontario. This is achieved through the development and administration of large-scale student assessments and the public release of assessment findings together with recommendations for system improvement.

Provincial Schools Authority

The Provincial Schools Authority (PSA) was established in 1975 under the Provincial Schools Negotiations Act. It is the employer of record for teachers, principals and vice-principals employed in provincially operated schools. The PSA is involved in collective bargaining with the bargaining unit of all teachers employed in provincially operated schools called the Provincial Schools Authority Teachers (PSAT). The PSA also handles grievances, leaves and related administrative functions.

Advisory Agencies:

Minister's Advisory Council on Special Education

The Minister's Advisory Council on Special Education advises the minister on any matter related to the establishment and provision of special education programs and services for students with special education needs.

Curriculum Council

The Curriculum Council provides high-level strategic policy advice to the minister on issues affecting the elementary and secondary curriculum. The Curriculum Council allows a forum of knowledgeable English-language and French-language education sector leaders to engage in high-level discussion, at the request of the minister, and provide advice, driven by sound educational pedagogy. As required, the Council may convene a working group of experts to gather further information and conduct consultations to inform their deliberations.


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MINISTRY FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The following chart depicts the ministry's investment in 2015-16 in activities that provide Ontario students with an excellent and accountable elementary/secondary education, so their futures and that of the province will be characterized by continued prosperity, stability and growth.

2015/16 Ministry Budget by Program — Operating Expense*.

2015/16 Ministry Budget by Program – Operating Expense

Pie Chart Description

*Includes Statutory Appropriations but excludes consolidation adjustments and assets. Numbers and percentages may not appear to add due to rounding.

2015/16 Ministry Budget by Program — Capital Expense**

2015/16 Ministry Budget by Program – Capital Expense

Pie Chart Description

** The "Other" category includes expenses related to capital assets as well as amortization expenses in votes 1002 and 1004. Numbers and percentages may not appear to add due to rounding.

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Ministry Planned Expenditures 2015-16 ($M)*
Operating24,781.1
Capital1,461.1
TOTAL*26,242.2

* Includes Statutory Appropriations but does not include consolidation adjustments. After consolidation adjustments (for agency and school board expense), the total 2015/16 planned expenditure including statutory appropriations is $25,301.7M. This total, excluding statutory appropriations is $25,227.5M.

2015/16 Ministry Expenditure (Operating and Capital) – Total $26,242.2M.

*Includes Statutory Appropriations but excludes consolidation adjustments and assets. Numbers and percentages may not appear to add due to rounding.

Pie Chart Description

*Includes Statutory Appropriations but excludes consolidation adjustments and assets.
Numbers and percentages may not appear to add due to rounding.

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Total Operating and Capital Summary by Vote

Vote/Program Estimates
2015-16
Change from
2014-15 Estimates
Estimates
2014-15*
Interim actuals
2014-15*
Actuals
2013-14*
$ $ % $ $ $
OPERATING EXPENSE
Ministry Administration Program 21,927,400 - - 21,927,400 19,789,200 15,243,627
Elementary and Secondary Education Program 23,311,812,000 194,265,200 0.8 23,117,546,800 22,946,393,400 22,340,570,435
Community Services Information and Information Technology Cluster 61,078,800 268,400 0.4 60,810,400 58,508,000 43,130,067
Child Care and Early Years Programs 1,315,242,100 152,541,300 13.1 1,162,700,800 1,173,405,600 1,056,098,741
Less: Special Warrants - (4,490,976,400) (100.0) 4,490,976,400 - -
Total Operating Expense to
be Voted
24,710,060,300 4,838,051,300 24.3 19,872,009,000 24,198,096,200 23,455,042,870
Special Warrants - (4,490,976,400) (100.0) 4,490,976,400 - -
Statutory Appropriations 71,066,014 (435,998,000) (86.0) 507,064,014 571,064,014 872,812,622
Ministry Total Operating Expense 24,781,126,314 (88,923,100) (0.4) 24,870,049,414 24,769,160,214 24,327,855,492
Consolidation Adjustment — Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) 1,869,600 1,808,800 2,975.0 60,800 1,735,500 588,000
Consolidation Adjustment — Ontario Education Communications Authority (TVO) 11,674,700 756,200 6.9 10,918,500 13,223,900 5,296,000
Consolidation Adjustment — Office des télécommunications educatives de langue français de l'Ontario (TFO) 1,965,100 1,331,100 210.0 634,000 4,414,600 (1,213,000)
Consolidation Adjustment — School Board Trust Debt Payment Reclassification (65,723,500) 113,000 0.2 (65,836,500) (65,723,500) (65,836,554)
Consolidation Adjustment — Schools (216,854,800) 3,865,900 1.8 (220,720,700) (254,556,500) (416,038,800)
Consolidation Adjustment — Hospitals (3,500,000) - - (3,500,000) (3,829,800) (3,018,000)
Consolidation Adjustment — Colleges (24,067,300) (2,489,300) (11.5) (21,578,000) (24,067,300) (22,889,510)
Total Including Consolidation
& Other Adjustments
24,486,490,114 (83,537,400) (0.3) 24,570,027,514 24,440,357,114 23,824,743,628
OPERATING ASSETS
Elementary and Secondary Education Program 2,700,000 400,000 17.4 2,300,000 2,300,000 1,690,608
Community Services Information and Information Technology Cluster 1,000 - - 1,000 1,000 -
Less: Special Warrants - (575,000) (100.0) 575,000 - -
Total Operating Assets to
be Voted
2,701,000 975,000 56.5 1,726,000 2,301,000 1,690,608
Special Warrants - (575,000) (100.0) 575,000 - -
Statutory Appropriations - - - - - -
Ministry Total Operating Assets 2,701,000 400,000 17.4 2,301,000 2,301,000 1,690,608

* Estimates, Interim Actuals and Actuals for prior fiscal years are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2015 Ontario Budget.

Total Operating and Capital Summary by Vote: Continued
Vote/Program Estimates
2015-16
Change from
2014-15 Estimates
Estimates
2014-15*
Interim actuals
2014-15*
Actuals
2013-14*
$ $ % $ $ $
CAPITAL EXPENSE
Elementary and Secondary Education Program 1,451,291,100 42,151,100 3.0 1,409,140,000 1,261,344,600 1,207,899,564
Child Care and Early Years Programs 6,662,700 - - 6,662,700 6,684,600 9,139,809
Less: Special Warrants - (462,615,900) (100.0) 462,615,900 - -
Total Capital Expense to be Voted 1,457,953,800 504,767,000 53.0 953,186,800 1,268,029,200 1,217,039,373
Special Warrants - (462,615,900) (100.0) 462,615,900 - -
Statutory Appropriations 3,145,600 2,019,900 179.4 1,125,700 1,682,300 468,686
Ministry Total Capital Expense 1,461,099,400 44,171,000 3.1 1,416,928,400 1,269,711,500 1,217,508,059
Consolidation Adjustment — Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) 363,600 423,600 706.0 (60,000) 5,500 332,000
Consolidation Adjustment — Ontario Education Communications Authority (TVO) 762,200 (1,491,100) (66.2) 2,253,300 1,989,300 3,443,000
Consolidation & Other Adjustment — Office des télécommunications éducatives de langue français de l'Ontario (TFO) 376,100 (1,186,500) (75.9) 1,562,600 1,642,500 2,161,000
Consolidation Adjustment — School (647,403,000) (6,248,400) (1.0) (641,154,600) (548,485,600) (530,647,600)
Total Including Consolidation
& Other Adjustments
815,198,300 35,668,600 4.6 779,529,700 724,863,200 692,796,459
CAPITAL ASSETS
Elementary and Secondary Education Program 3,060,400 (1,854,600) (37.7) 4,915,000 4,718,300 5,160,878
Child Care and Early Years Programs 1,000 (4,545,200) (100.0) 4,546,200 4,546,200 6,581,714
Less: Special Warrants - (2,473,000) (100.0) 2,473,000 - -
Total Capital Assets to
be Voted
3,061,400 (3,926,800) (56.2) 6,988,200 9,264,500 11,742,592
Special Warrants - (2,473,000) (100.0) 2,473,000 - -
Statutory Appropriations - - - - - -
Ministry Total Capital Assets 3,061,400 (6,399,800) (67.6) 9,461,200 9,264,500 11,742,592
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets) 25,301,688,414 (47,868,800) (0.2) 25,349,557,214 25,165,220,314 24,517,540,087

* Estimates, Interim Actuals and Actuals for prior fiscal years are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2015 Ontario Budget.

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Appendix

2014-15 Annual Report

The ministry's work to implement Achieving Excellence: A Renewed Vision for Education in Ontario began in 2014-15.

Achieving Excellence: A Renewed Vision for Education in Ontario

Renewed Vision for Education in Ontario The ministry's renewed vision builds on the progress of the last 10 years. It focuses on achieving excellence for both the learners and the educators. While there is a continued focus on the basics of reading, writing and mathematics, the ministry is also placing a greater emphasis on higher-order skills, like critical thinking, communication, collaboration and entrepreneurship.

The renewed vision has four key goals:

  • Achieving excellence
  • Ensuring equity
  • Promoting well-being
  • Enhancing public confidence.

This renewed vision will guide the ministry's work over the years to come. The following pages provide a snapshot of the accomplishments over the last year. This list is by no means exhaustive.

Achieving Excellence

Graduation Rate
Ontario's high school graduation rate remained strong with 84 per cent of students graduating in 2014. This is 16 percentage points higher than in 2004. That means approximately 163,000 more students have graduated over the past 10 years than would have if the graduation rate remained at the 2004 level.

Reading, Writing and Math results
Ontario students continued to make progress on province wide assessments by the Education Quality and Accountability Office, with 72 per cent of grades 3 and 6 students meeting or exceeding the provincial standard in reading, writing and math. This is an increase of 18 percentage points compared to 2003. This increase, combined with the consistent improvement in achievement scores since 2003, means more than 170,000 elementary students now have a higher proficiency in reading, writing and math.

New Math Supports
Ontario took steps to help students improve and build their math skills by providing both teachers and students with more tools, resources and learning opportunities. These resources include creating more opportunities for teachers to gain additional qualifications in math through new professional learning workshops and summer learning programs.

Technology and Learning Fund
The province invested $150 million over three years in technology and learning tools to enrich the classroom experience for students from junior kindergarten to Grade 12. This investment will give students more opportunities to become technologically savvy with tablets, netbooks, cameras and software — while preparing them for success in the global economy. This fund will also strengthen professional learning for educators who will use technology and digital resources to enhance student engagement, learning and achievement, guided by international and Ontario-based research on effective innovations in learning and teaching practices for a connected, digital world.

Resources for French as a Second Language
Ontario is providing English speaking students with access to new education resources for French as a Second Language. TFO's online multimedia educational resources include videos, websites and games for students and parents.

Promoting French-language and culture
Since 2004, Ontario's French-language and culture policies and initiatives (aménagement linguistique) have contributed to steady academic success and a renewed vitality in French-language school boards and communities. The province is currently developing a refreshed action plan for aménagement linguistique — from the early years to postsecondary education and training.

Specialist High Skills Majors
The province is helping more students prepare for tomorrow's jobs by expanding its Specialist High Skills Major program. This program helps more high school students find their career passion and get the skills and knowledge they need for jobs in the 21st century. More than 44,000 students were enrolled in 1,685 programs in 2014-15. This is an increase of 2,000 students and 125 programs over last year.

Education Experts
Ontario appointed four experts to advise the Premier and Minister of Education on how to turn the renewed vision for education into action. Dr. Carol Campbell, Dr. Jean Clinton, Michael Fullan OC, Professor Emeritus, and Dr. Andy Hargreaves will counsel the government on how to move forward on implementing the Achieving Excellence vision.

Pan-Canadian Assessment Program (PCAP)
Results of a nationwide assessment show that Ontario's Grade 8 students ranked the highest in reading, and second in science and math. According to the PCAP 2013 report, Ontario was the only province that scored at or above the Canadian average in all three subjects.

Equity

More Opportunities for Aboriginal Students
Ontario launched an innovative new pilot program to help more Aboriginal students develop business and entrepreneurial skills. The province is partnering with the Martin Aboriginal Education Initiative to support Aboriginal Youth Entrepreneurship Program for First Nation, Métis and Inuit students.

Summer Learning Program
The Summer Learning Program provides additional support for students in school communities with lower socio-economic profiles through a blend of classroom learning and recreation programming in the summer months. With three weeks of instruction time, the program supports learning in literacy and numeracy, and also includes First Nations, Métis and Inuit focused classes. In addition to improving their literacy and numeracy skills, students gain self-confidence and reduce their summer learning loss.

Promoting Well-Being

Updated Health and Physical Education Curriculum and Parent Resources
In February 2015, Ontario released an updated Health and Physical Education curriculum to give students accurate information that will help keep them safe and healthy. The updated curriculum will be used in schools starting in September and reflects current topics of health, safety and well-being for students. The province is also providing parents with resources to help them support their children's learning at home.

60 Minutes of Physical Activity
Through a partnership with ACTIVE AT SCHOOL and the Ontario Physical and Health Education Association, Ontario is helping to provide students with access and opportunities to participate in 60 minutes of daily physical activity connected to their school day.

Public Confidence

Additional Parent Consultations on Health and Physical Education Curriculum
As part of extensive consultations on the Health and Physical Education curriculum, the province engaged parents across the province for additional feedback in fall 2014. Approximately 4,000 parents (or one parent from every elementary school) across Ontario had the opportunity to provide feedback to the government through a secure survey.

New Collective Bargaining Framework
After extensive consultation with all education sector stakeholders, including unions, teacher federations, and trustees' associations, the School Boards Collective Bargaining Act (SBCBA) came into force in April 2014. The SBCBA established a new legal framework for collective bargaining in Ontario's education sector by creating a two-tier collective bargaining process and more clearly defined roles for all parties, including the Crown.

Review of the Toronto District School Board
In November 2014, the province asked Margaret Wilson to conduct a review of the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) amid growing concerns of governance issues at Ontario's largest school board.

In January 2015, the province directed the TDSB to take action by February 13 to address governance structure and operational issues identified in Margaret Wilson's review.

In addition, based on Ms. Wilson's recommendation, the Minister of Education has appointed a seven-member panel to lead public consultations on how to improve the governance structure at the TDSB. The panel will look for ways to improve the day-to-day function and enhance efficiencies at the board.

Moving Forward on Child Care and the Early Years

Full-day kindergarten
As of September 2014, the province had fully rolled out its full-day kindergarten program (FDK) — making it available to all four- and five- year-olds in Ontario. By the end of the 2014-15 school year, almost half a million students will have benefitted from FDK since it was introduced in 2010. Full-day kindergarten is one of most significant investments Ontario has made in education in a generation.

Child Care Modernization Act
In December, the Child Care Modernization Act, 2014, passed third reading in the Ontario legislature. This legislation will strengthen oversight of the province's unlicensed child care sector and increase access to licensed child care options for families. In addition, it will allow the province to immediately shut down a child care provider when a child's safety is at risk. An incremental and phased process is planned to implement the provisions under the new Act.

Wage Increase for Early Childhood Educators
Ontario is increasing wages for early childhood educators and front-line child care professionals in licensed child care settings. The province implemented a wage increase of $1 per hour plus benefits for eligible child care program staff working in the licensed child care sector.

Investing in Infrastructure

Since 2003, Ontario has invested $12.9 billion in school infrastructure, including nearly 725 new schools and more than 700 additions and renovations.

In 2014, the ministry announced a four-year investment of $750 million to support the new School Consolidation Capital program which will help school boards manage their school space more efficiently. It will support consolidation projects such as new schools, additions, and retrofits to help address excess capacity.

To date, more than $1.5 billion has been allocated in capital funding to support the implementation of full-day kindergarten. This funding has been used to support the creation of about 3,500 new kindergarten classrooms through additions and major retrofits.

Making Our Vision a Reality

Ontario's publicly funded education system is already recognized as one of the best in the world — and we are committed to making it even better.

In the years to come, the ministry will improve the quality of Ontario's publicly funded education system and take it from great to excellent. This will ensure that our young people have the learning and skills they need to lead in the global economy.

Building on these achievements — including higher test scores and a rising graduation rate — the ministry is once again raising the bar for Ontario's publicly funded education system, for our students, and for the future prosperity of this great province.

By working together, the ministry can make the renewed vision, Achieving Excellence, a reality. This will give all the children in Ontario the opportunity to reach their full potential. The ministry will support their success inside and outside of the classroom to build a better province for all Ontarians.


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Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2014-15*
Operating 24,769.2
Capital 1,269.7
Staff Strength**
(as of March 31, 2015)
1,814.0

*Includes Statutory Appropriations, Bad Debt Expense, and reconcilation adjustments but does not include consolidation adjustments. This number is based on Restated Interim Actuals, and final actual expenditures will be stated in 2014/15 Public Accounts.

**This number excludes seasonal staff, students, and employees on leave.

ISSN # 2369-1905

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