Results-Based Plan 2010/11

Previous Results-Based Plans:


Table of Contents

Part l: Published Results-Based Plan 2010/11

Ministry Financial Information

Appendix:


ISSN # 1718-6463

Part l: Published Results-Based Plan 2010/11

Ministry Overview

The Ministry of Education strives to promote a strong, vibrant, publicly funded education system that is focused on three goals: high levels of student achievement, reduced gaps in student achievement and high levels of public confidence.

Vision

Ontario students will receive the best publicly funded education in the world, measured by high levels of achievement and engagement for all students. Successful learning outcomes will give all students the skills, knowledge and opportunities to attain their potential, to pursue lifelong learning, and to contribute to a prosperous, cohesive society.

Mission

The ministry seeks to energize Ontario's publicly funded education system through stronger partnerships. The wisdom of educators and all those working in the education sector will continue to be sought and valued. Parents will be engaged more in the education of their children. Students will be given a stronger voice in the education they are receiving. More relationships with employers and local leaders will be strengthened to improve linkages between schools and communities.

These partnerships will create a publicly funded education system that can reach every student.

Key Priorities And Results

The ministry's work supports four government priorities:

  • Success for Students
  • Strong People, Strong Economy
  • Better Health
  • Safer Communities
Key Priorities & Results Chart

Success for Students

Student achievement from kindergarten to Grade 12 is the top priority in education. The overall skill and knowledge level of Ontario's students must continue to rise to remain competitive in a global economy. At the same time, the achievement gap must continue to be closed between students who excel and students who struggle because of personal, cultural or academic barriers.

As of fall 2009, student achievement is now officially the top priority for school boards. The passage of the government's Student Achievement and School Board Governance Act has solidified this as the focal point of the Education Act.

The legislation clarifies the duties of trustees and the directors of education, provides authority for the regulation of trustee codes of conduct, audit committees and parent involvement committees and requires boards to develop and implement strategic plans — the goal of which is student achievement and well-being. This will allow Ontario's education partners to work more effectively together, helping more students succeed.

In addition, the government filed a Provincial Interest Regulation on February 26, 2010 which provides a process for the Minister of Education to work with a school board to address serious and persistent concerns relating to student achievement, student health and safety, school board governance or parent involvement, should they arise. The ministry consulted with stakeholders about the proposed regulation during the summer of 2009 and received feedback that helped refine its content and approach. The regulation provides a framework of collaborative measures for boards and the ministry to work together to address any identified concerns.

Student achievement and well-being is our number one priority. That is why the government continues to implement initiatives that ensure more students succeed. These include full-day learning, Safe Schools, the Literacy and Numeracy Strategy and the Student Success Strategy. As well, the formation of the Student Achievement division supports better coherence and alignment in student achievement strategies from Kindergarten to Grade 12.

New Initiatives

Full-Day Learning

In September 2010, when the first phase of full-day learning begins, up to 35,000 four- and five-year-olds in nearly 600 schools will benefit from an integrated day of learning and play. More full-day learning locations will be added each year with the goal of having the program available to all four- and five-year-olds by 2015-16.

This will give our youngest students a stronger start to their education and supports our plan to create a stronger, well-educated work force. The government is providing $245 million in capital funding over the next two years to support the implementation of full-day learning across Ontario.

Connections For Students

Beginning in March 2010, all publicly funded school boards will have the Connections for Students model in place to assist students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The goal of this model is to provide more coordinated transitions for students who are ready to leave the intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) services delivered through the Autism Intervention Program (AIP) and start or continue with applied behaviour analysis (ABA) instructional methods in schools.

The provincewide implementation of the model will lead to better alignment of:

  • Individual Education Plans, transition plans and progress reports that will support students in acquiring, generalizing and maintaining their learning;
  • clear and understandable transition planning that will reduce parent and student anxiety;
  • clearer guidelines and expectations for family involvement in the process of transitioning for their children;
  • and increased collaboration among regional autism service providers, school board staff and parents/guardians throughout the transition process.

Each member of the transition team will utilize their professional knowledge in an intra-disciplinary approach to support the child's transition to a school setting in a seamless manner.

Ongoing Initiatives

The Literacy and Numeracy Strategy is focused on helping students establish a solid foundation in reading, writing and math by age 12.

In 2002-03, only 54 per cent of Grade 3 and 6 students were achieving the provincial standard (equivalent to a B grade) in reading, writing and math assessments. Students who struggle with these skills often become discouraged and later drop out of school.

The government set a target to have 75 per cent of students meet the provincial standard and continues to implement initiatives to help more students be confident and competent in reading, writing and math. There are several initiatives in place to help Ontario students get there.

  • As of the 2010-11 school year 11,430 additional teaching positions are being funded. This is the total number of new teaching positions based on investments made by the government since coming to office. These teachers help students improve reading, writing and math skills, bring down class sizes and boost student achievement in areas such as music, the arts and physical education, and increase secondary student success.
  • Elementary students are benefiting from more than two million new books in school libraries across the province. Every publicly funded elementary school in Ontario received funds to enhance their library collections.
  • There are now 144 Parenting and Family Literacy Centres in schools, where parents and their children from birth to age 6 participate together in activities which help build essential literacy, numeracy, language, and social skills through stories, music and play.
  • Student Achievement Officers work directly with principals, teachers and board leaders to improve student learning and achievement in reading, writing and math. In addition, government funding has been targeted for boards to hire additional expertise (e.g., Numeracy Facilitators, Student Work Study Teachers).
  • Schools On The Move identifies elementary schools that are succeeding in challenging circumstances and encourages them to share their literacy and numeracy strategies with other schools. More schools will be identified this spring.
  • Targeted support for over 1,000 elementary schools that are “in the middle,” where 50 to 74 per cent of students are meeting the provincial standard. Boards received funding for professional learning about reading, writing and mathematics for teams of teachers and principals to help them boost student achievement to the next level.
  • Continued support of before- and after-school tutoring programs during 2010-11.
  • Additional staff for Small and Northern Boards (Math Facilitators) and Student Work Teachers.
  • Enhanced focus on collaborative, job-embedded professional learning to support teaching and learning.

Curriculum and Assessment

In addition, we are continuing to keep our curriculum current and relevant. The revised curriculum is based on research and extensive consultations, and supports the ministry's goals and policies.
Revised curriculum policy documents for mandatory implementation will be in place for the following subjects, beginning September 2010:

  • Grades 9 – 12, The Arts
  • Grades 1 – 8, Health and Physical Education (interim)

French-Language School Boards will also implement the following four curriculum policy documents that address the needs of newcomers:

  • Grades 1 – 8, Actualisation linguistique en français (ALF)
  • Grades 1 – 8, Programme d'appui aux nouveau arrivants (PANA)
  • Grades 9 – 12, ALF
  • Grades 9 – 12, PANA

Starting September 2011, financial literacy will be seamlessly incorporated into the existing Grade 4 to 12 curriculum. Developing financial knowledge and skills during their school years will contribute to a more prosperous financial future for our students and for all Ontarians.

Educational experts agree that effectively implemented assessment and evaluation practices improve student learning. The updated, consolidated Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting Policy for grades 1 to 12, Growing Success will be in place for the 2010-2011 school year with resources and training to improve consistency and clarity and to support good teacher practice

Performance Measures

In 2008-09, 67 per cent of Grade 3 and Grade 6 students met the provincial standard in reading, writing and math. This represents a 13 percentage point increase since 2002-03. The results for each school are available on the EQAO website.

Ontario has also demonstrated strong results compared to other jurisdictions. The province's nine- and ten-year-old students rank among the top in the world in reading according to the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study. In addition, the Pan-Canadian Assessment Program report showed that Ontario's 13-year-old English-language students scored significantly higher in reading than their peers in other provinces and territories.

Results for the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment, which had a major focus on reading, will be released in winter 2010. In 2006, Canada ranked 4th among 57 countries and Ontario's results were similar to Canada's.

Strong People, Strong Economy

A strong publicly funded education will help ensure the long-term success of the province's economy. Ontario remains focused on helping more students achieve success in high school and graduate with high quality skills and knowledge. This will provide Ontario with the innovators and leaders it needs to keep the economy strong in the future.

The Student Success Strategy helps students in grades 7 to 12 tailor their education to their individual strengths, goals and interests, and brings back students who have left school without finishing their diploma.

In 2003-04, only 68 per cent of students were completing their high school diploma. Studies show that those students who do not graduate face a future with an increased risk of unemployment, financial difficulties and social issues. In response, the government set a graduation target of 85 per cent.

To help more students graduate, several programs will be launched or expanded in FY 2010/11.

  • Specialist High Skills Majors (SHSM) are bundles of 8-10 classroom courses, workplace experiences and sector certifications in 19 different economic sectors such as information and communications technology, manufacturing and hospitality.
    • In 2009-10 over 740 SHSM programs were offered in over 430 secondary schools.
    • For 2010-11 over 1,050 SHSM programs will be offered in over 530 secondary schools.
    • Three new sectors in Education and Training, Public Service and Not-For-Profit will be introduced this year.
    • Enrolment in this program is expected to grow from 20,000 participants to over 28,000 in 2010-11 in over 1,000 SHSM programs.
  • Expansion of Cooperative Education allows high school students to apply two co-op credits towards the 18 compulsory credits required for graduation.
  • Dual Credits allow students to earn credits that count towards both their high school diploma and their college diploma/degree or apprenticeship certification. This will be expanded from 302 programs to more than 375 in 2010-11.
  • Student Voice strengthens student participation in their school and the development of provincial education policy. It includes a Minister's Student Advisory Council, funding for student-led projects and regional student forums.
  • Destination Réussite supports French-language school boards in the implementation of Student Success Strategy initiatives at their schools through regional teams that include school board and college/university staff.
  • The Student Success School Support Initiative will be expanded to include three additional school boards with a total of approx 90 participating schools. This initiative provides targeted supports to a limited number of schools in the areas of leadership and instructional expertise to guide improvement efforts.

Performance Measures

In 2008-09, Ontario's graduation rate increased to 79 per cent. This represents an increase of 11 percentage points – or over 52, 500 additional students – compared to 2003-04.

Percentage of classrooms with 20 of fewer students

Better Health

Health is a priority in Ontario's education system. Healthy students have demonstrated higher levels of learning and skill development and are more likely to be healthy adults. They also have a higher quality of life and lower impact on the health care system.

Ontario's Healthy Schools Strategy is focused on supporting learning and growing through good food, daily physical activity and health promotion.

With childhood obesity rates on the rise, the government has taken action to create a healthier environment for students.

  • In January 2010, new nutritional standards for schools were unveiled through the comprehensive School Food and Beverage Policy. Although the policy does not take effect until September 2011, schools are encouraged to begin taking action as soon as possible.
  • The Healthy Schools Recognition Program encourages schools to declare a commitment to developing a healthier learning environment.
  • The Community Use of Schools program provides funding to all school boards to help offset the cost of providing not-for-profit community group access to school facilities after school hours at reduced rates. Currently, 150 priority schools in 27 school boards offer not-for-profit groups free access to after-hours school space for affordable sport, art and recreation programs for youth. An additional 25 priority schools will be added at the beginning of the 2010-11 school year.

Performance Measures

Successful training of over 440 staff from school board teams and public health on the School Food and Beverage Policy.

In 2008-09, 1,024 schools pledged to undertake 1,968 healthy activities as a part of the Healthy Schools Recognition Program. Teachers, students and parents from each school identified at least one activity they would undertake to make their school a healthier place to learn. The participating schools and their activities are listed on the Healthy Schools website. Overall, since the program began in 2006, more than 3,000 schools have pledged to do more than 6,500 healthy activities through the program.

Since the Community Use of Schools program began in 2004, all Ontario school boards have participated in the initiative. The Community Use of Schools program has reduced access fees across Ontario and increased access to school space.

Safer Communities

Every Ontario student has the right to feel safe and be safe when they go to school. Safe schools are also a prerequisite for student success and academic achievement.

Ontario's Safe Schools Strategy allows children to learn, grow and achieve in a safe and secure environment. The following initiatives are being introduced or expanded in support of the Strategy.

  • Ongoing curriculum updates that will include more detailed information about gender-based violence, homophobia, sexual harassment and bullying.
  • A resource guide about student-to-student sexual assault will be distributed to schools and school boards before the start of the 2010-11 school year.
  • The third week of November has been officially recognized as Bullying Prevention and Awareness Week.
  • Providing $10 million in annual funding to 34 select high schools located in urban areas that face challenges such as poverty, criminal and gang activity, and a lack of community resources.
  • Continuing our $1 million per year partnership with Kids Help Phone to provide 24/7 online and phone counselling for issues including bullying and cyber-bullying.
  • Providing $34.7 million in annual funding to school boards to: provide programs for expelled and long-term suspended students; and, to acquire additional para-professional resources to work with at-risk students.
  • Continuation of the Student Support Leadership Initiative which supports clusters of school boards and community agencies to form and enhance partnerships to provide non-academic supports that promote positive student behaviour, consistent with Ontario's policy framework for child and youth mental health.
    • In 2010/11, $3 million will be allocated to clusters to deepen their partnerships to include additional mental health partners.
  • In 2010/11, Ontario will provide $2.5 million to  boards to promote activities at the school level that will improve and promote a positive school climate.

Performance Measures

The Ministry provided training and resources to boards teams on October 20 and 21, 2009 on the new safe schools legislative requirements; related regulations and policy requirements relating to revised Policy and Program Memoranda 144 (Bullying Prevention and Intervention) and 145 (Progressive Discipline and Promoting Positive Student Behaviour). In addition, school board teams provided training to school teams on these requirements.

As a result of an ongoing partnership with the Ministry of Education, Kids Help Phone has helped over 50,000 Ontario kids with bullying-related issues by phone and through their online counselling, information and referral services, surpassing the original target of helping 30,000 kids.

Reach Every Student

There are a number of other new or ongoing ministry initiatives that support success for students; strong people, strong economy; better health; and safer communities. They are also helping to increase student achievement, close the achievement gap and raise public confidence.

  • Engaging parents through funding for School Councils and Parent Involvement Committees, as well as through Parents Reaching Out Grants.
  • Supporting French-language and Aboriginal education through increased funding and expanded programs.
  • Supporting Aboriginal education through implementation of the Ontario First Nation, Métis and Inuit Education Policy Framework (PDF, 258 KB).
  • Supporting French-language education with the Politique d'aménagement linguistique and the implementation of the Policy Statement and Guidelines on the Admission, Welcoming, and Support of Students in French-Language Schools in Ontario.
  • Supporting French-Language education with resources and training on the “Approche culturelle de l'enseignement” that will allow educators to support students in the development of their cultural identity.
  • Supporting students with special education needs through increased funding and providing school boards with the flexibility needed to seek efficiencies and optimize effectiveness in the purchase of specialized equipment for students with special education needs.
  • Continuing to repair, renovate and build new schools, and make schools more energy efficient.
  • Implementing Renewable Energy projects in over 100 schools.
  • Piloting a variety of innovative green products and technologies in over 150 Ontario schools through the Green Schools Pilot Initiative.
  • Delivering $144 million in targeted funding outside of the Grants for Student Needs (the annual government funding for schools) for boards to support student achievement, including library staff, Ontario Focused Intervention Partnership, Schools Helping Schools and Official Languages in Education.
  • Continuing to improve the education funding formula with a variety of structural reforms, including updating all census-driven calculations to the most current data available for the 2010-11 school year.
  • Measures to help school boards with declining enrolment.
  • A new Fall Progress Report Card will be introduced in September 2010, and new report card templates will be used for the 2010-11 school year. The revised format encourages earlier, more personalized and ongoing communication between parents, students and teachers.
  • A Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research will be established to enable researchers working in partnership with the ministry and educators to conduct applied education research and develop systematic knowledge, capacity and application of effective practices to support student achievement and well-being.
  • Conducting an Adult and Continuing Education Business Model Review, in partnership with Council of Ontario Directors of Education, Council of Senior Business Officials and Ontario Association of Adult and Continuing Education School Board Administrators, to examine a variety of business models in a number of English and French-language school boards to determine what factors contribute to a viable adult and continuing education credit programs in remote, rural and urban school boards, that are both flexible and responsive to community needs.
  • Enhancing the capacity of school boards to recognize and assess prior learning by field testing new assessment tools and resources:
    • Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) Grade 9 and 10 Individual Assessment Packages in French and English, including updated guides and model assessments that reflect current curriculum expectations and assessment policy.
    • First language challenge assessment guides in English and French with assessments of first language proficiency in Mandarin, Cantonese, Punjabi, Arabic, Spanish, Persian (Farsi) and Russian to support both regular day school and mature students who want to challenge for Level 3 and Level 4 International Language credits ready for piloting in 2010-11.

Support for Educators

There are also several commitments to — and supports and programs for — boards and educators that will be continued, introduced or expanded in FY 2010/11.

  • Working with teachers' federations and school boards to ensure continued peace and progress.
  • Meeting our funding commitments to support four more years of labour peace and stability in our schools.
  • Rewarding and recognizing educators with the Premier's Awards for Teaching Excellence.
  • Continuing to provide workshops to over 8,000 teacher candidates annually to help them make the transition from the faculty to the classroom.
  • Enhancing the work of boards as they continue to provide training to Student Success and Cross Panel Teams focusing on ministry deliverables including tracking and monitoring of students, coordinating timelines, facilitating staff learning and assessing for team effectiveness.
  • Focusing on the implementation of protective factors that promote Being, Belonging and Becoming at the school and classroom levels and the expanded tracking and monitoring of secondary school students in Grades 12 and 12+.
  • Extending the use of a process for collaborative, job embedded professional learning – the Student Success Professional Learning Cycle – that is flexible and based on the time required for teacher collaboration in planning, implementing and reflecting on a learning module or unit of study, grades 7-12; emphasizing the use of data and evidence of student learning and engagement as the starting point for professional learning.
  • The Managing Information for Student Achievement (MISA), initiative, now in its sixth year, continues to support boards and schools in growing their capacity to use evidence and data to develop effective strategies for improved student outcomes. In 2010-11, boards will be provided with an $8M funding allocation for the purpose of implementing their MISA Plans.
  • The Ontario Leadership Strategy (OLS), launched in Fall 2008 is now in its third year of ongoing implementation.
    • In 2010-11, boards will be provided with a $5M funding allocation over the school year with the expectation that they will put a Board Leadership Development Strategy in place.
    • This strategy will set out the boards' succession planning and talent development initiatives, including mentoring for newly appointed school leaders, and will directly support the goals of school and board improvement plans for student achievement and the board strategic plan.
    • The Ministry will also provide support for mentoring of newly appointed Supervisory Officers, Directors of Education and executive leadership development for experienced Supervisory Officers and Directors of Education.
  • Beginning in September 2010 all boards will be required, by regulation, to implement a performance appraisal process for principals and vice-principals. The appraisal process will focus on both results related to student achievement, and professional growth. The implementation of Principal Performance Appraisal (PPA) in 2010/11 will build on three years of voluntary implementation by boards.
  • Beginning in March 2011, all boards will be required to have put in place terms and conditions of employment for principals and vice-principals in accordance with PPM #152 (Terms and Conditions of Employment for Principals and Vice-Principals).

Key Investments

  • For the 2010-11 school year:
    • 566 more elementary specialist teachers to support 10 additional minutes of preparation time per week
    • 132 more Grade 4 to 8 teachers to reduce class sizes
    • More support for elementary student supervision
    • Increased professional learning opportunities for elementary and secondary teachers
    • 216 more secondary teachers to support expanded programming
  • Investing $20.2 billion in education for the 2010-11 school year, an increase of $694 million over the previous year. This represents an increase of more than $5.8 billion or 40 per cent since 2002-03, and a per-pupil increase of over $3,500 a student, which is an increase of almost 50% under this government.
  • Investing $1.24 billion in Ontario's French-language schools in 2010-11, an increase of 4.2 per cent from the previous year. Under this government, annual funding for French-language boards has increased by about $488.1 million – $5,676 more per student, an increase of 63%.
  • Increasing funding for First Nation, Métis and Inuit education initiatives from $12.1 million in 2007-08 to $35.4 million for the 2010-11 school year, an increase of $8.3 million, or 30.9%, over 2009-10 and an increase of 193% since the grant was introduced.
  • Increasing funding for special education to $2.31 billion for the 2010-11 school year, an increase of $65.5 million from the previous year and 42.3% under this government.
  • Increasing funding to $5 million for boards to establish audit committees with external representation in the 2010-11 school year.
  • Investing $200 million in 2010-11 and $300 million in 2011-12 for the implementation of full-day learning.
  • Providing $245 million in capital funding to school boards to build new classrooms and renovate existing ones to support the implementation of full-day learning.

Poverty Reduction
The Ministry of Education is also supporting Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy. This is a long-term strategy focused on improving opportunities for Ontario's kids.
The strategy is focused on children and youth, with the goal of breaking the cycle of poverty by improving their success in school, supporting families, and empowering communities.
Schools alone cannot eradicate child poverty. What we can do is help identify barriers to student success and achievement and help reduce those barriers.

A strong early learning program will make our education system stronger – and a strong publicly funded education system is key to our poverty reduction plan.

Full-day learning will help give children the best possible start to school and to life; the high-quality, integrated programs, before- and after-school, will support busy parents. Full-day learning for four- and five-year-olds will be closely integrated with the poverty reduction plan with part of the initial focus being on low-income neighbourhoods.

More than one-half of the schools that will offer full-day learning during the first phase of implementation are in high-needs communities.

In addition, we have built on our investments over the past five years to help at-risk students and underserved communities, including:

  • Increasing the number of Parenting and Family Literacy Centres to 144 across the province. PFLCs are located in high-needs communities.
  • Increasing our investment in the Community Use of Schools program to $39 million for the 2010-11 school year. This includes a $5 million investment in the Priority Schools initiative which provides free access to school space outside school hours ensuring that school space for after-school activities continues to be affordable for not-for-profit groups.
  • Increasing the Learning Opportunities Grant (LOG) to $460.3 million for the 2010-11 school year. The Demographic Allocation of LOG provides funding to school boards based on social and economic indicators that have been associated with a higher risk of academic difficulties in order to improve the educational achievement of students. The Demographic Allocation is being restructured for the 2010-11 school year so that the prevalence of low income in a board's community plays a greater role in determining funding levels.
  • Increasing funding levels in key areas such as special education, transportation and school operations, to help boards keep up with costs.
  • Focusing a portion of the Parents Reaching Out Grant funding to help parents in higher-need areas participate in their child's education.

Moving forward, the Ministry of Education will:

  • Consult with stakeholders including parent groups and school board officials to develop guidelines regarding school activity fees.

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Ministry Organization Chart

Ministry of Education Organization Chart as of February 22, 2010

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Legislation

Education Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.E.2 as amended by S.O. 1991, c.10; S.O. 1991, c.15; S.O. 1992, c.15; S.O. 1992, c.16; S.O. 1992, c.17; S.O. 1992, c.27; S.O. 1992, c.32; S.O. 1993, c.11; S.O. 1993, c.23; S.O. 1993, c.26; S.O. 1993, c.27, Sched.; S.O. 1993, c.41; S.O. 1994, c.1; S.O. 1994, c.17; S.O. 1994, c.23; S.O. 1994, c.27; S.O. 1995, c.4; S.O. 1996, c.2; S.O. 1996, c.11; S.O. 1996, c.12; S.O. 1996, c.13; S.O. 1996, c.32; S.O. 1997, c.3; S.O. 1997, c.16; S.O. 1997, c.19; S.O. 1997, c.22; S.O. 1997, c.27; S.O. 1997, c.31; S.O. 1997, c.32; S.O. 1997, c.43, Sched.; S.O. 1998, c.3; S.O. 1998, c.14; S.O. 1998, c.33; S.O. 1999, c.6; S.O. 1999, c.9; S.O. 2000, c.5; S.O. 2000, c.11; S.O. 2000, c.12; S.O. 2000, c.25; S.O. 2000, c.26, Sched; S.O. 2001, c. 8; S.O. 2001, c. 13; S.O. 2001, c. 14, Sched.; S.O. 2001, c.17; S.O. 2001, c.23; S.O. 2001, c.24; 2002, c.7; 2002, c.8, Sched.A; 2002, c.8, Sched.I; 2002, c.17, Sched.C,; 2002, c.17, Sched.D; 2002, c.17, Sched.F, Table; 2002, c.18, Sched.G; 2002, c.22; 2003, c.2; 2004, c.8; 2004, c.31; 2005, c.4; 2005, c.5; 2006, c. 2; 2006, c. 5; 2006, c.9, Sched.H; 2006, c.10; 2006, c.17; 2006, c.21, Sched.F; 2006, c. 28; 2006, c.32, Sched.C; 2006, c.33, Sched.Z.3; 2006, c.34; 2006, c. 35, Sched. C; 2007, c.7, Sched. 9; 2007, c. 14; 2008, c. 2; 2008, c.7, Sch. F; 2008, c. 14; 2008, c. 19, Sch. D; 2009, c. 18, Sch. 10; 2009, c. 25; 2009, c. 33, Sch. 2, 6, 8, 13; 2009, c. 34, Sch. I.

EXCEPT: ss. 257.2.1; 257.5; 257.6(3) to (7); 257.7(3); 257.10(4),(5); 257.12; 257.12.1; 257.12.2; 257.12.3; 257.13 and 257.19(4), [see O.C. 1690/2003]
Governs elementary and secondary education in Ontario.

Education Amendment Act, (No. 1) 1986, S.O. 1986, c. 21.
Only s. 4 remains in force and unconsolidated. It provides that the school referred to in the Essex County French-language Secondary School Act, 1977, may be transferred to a Roman Catholic school board, notwithstanding s. 5 of that Act.

Education Quality and Accountability Office Act, 1996, S.O. 1996, c.11; S.O. 1997, c.31; 2004, c.8; 2004, c.17; 2006, c.21, Sched.F; 2006, c.35, Sched.C.
Establishes the Education Quality and Accountability Office, which evaluates the effectiveness of elementary and secondary education and assesses pupils' academic achievement.

Essex County French-language Secondary School Act, 1977, S.O. 1977, c. 5; 1986, c.21.
Required the former Essex County Board of Education to build a French-language secondary school.

Fairness for Parents and Employees Act (Teachers' Withdrawal of Services) 1997, c. 32; 2006, c.21, Sched.F; 2009, c. 33, Sch. 20.
Provided for payments to parents in circumstances where teachers withdrew services.

Lake Superior Board of Education Act, 1976, S.O. 1976, c. 59.
Allowed the former Lake Superior Board of Education to sell a teacher's or caretaker's residence to an employee of the Board.

Ontario College of Teachers Act, 1996, S.O. 1996, c.12, as amended by S.O. 1997, c.31; 2001, c.9; 2001, c.14; 2001, c.24; 2002, c.7; 2004, c.26; 2006, c.10; 2006, c.19, Sched.C; 2006, c.21, Sched.F; 2009, c. 33, Sch. 6, 13.
Establishes an independent professional regulatory body for Ontario teachers with Council comprised of elected teacher representatives and LGIC appointees. College sets standards of the profession, qualifications for registration by College and is responsible for discipline matters. All teachers in the public system must be members of the College.

Ontario Educational Communications Authority Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.12; 1997, c.26, Sched.; 1999, c.12, Sched.Q; 2002, c.8, Sched.G; 2002, c.8, Sched.I; 2002, c.18, Sched.G; 2004, c.17; 2006, c.35, Sched.C.; 2007, Sched. 7; 2008, c. 10.
Establishes broadcasting entity – TVO – with mandate to provide English-language educational broadcasting and delivery of distance education to students. Licensed by the CRTC, the federal broadcasting regulatory body.

Ontario French-language Educational Communications Authority Act, 2008, S.O. 2008, c.10.
Establishes broadcasting entity – TFO – with mandate to provide French-language educational broadcasting and delivery of distance education to students. Licensed by the CRTC, the federal broadcasting regulatory body.

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Repeal Act, 1996, S.O. 1996, c.16
Repealed the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Act.

Ontario School Trustees' Council Act, R.S.O. 1980, c.355
Establishes the Ontario School Trustees' Council

Ottawa-Carleton French-Language School Board Transferred Employees Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.44 as amended by 1992, c. 17; 1993, c. 11; 1993, c. 23; 1993, c. 27, Sched.; 1994, c. 1; S.O. 1997, c.31; 2002, c.17, Sched. F, Table.
Governs the transfer of employees from the former Ottawa and Carleton school boards to either of the former French-language school boards in Ottawa.

Provincial Schools Negotiations Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.P.35 as amended by S.O. 1996, c.12; S.O. 1997, c.31; 2003, c.2; 2006, c.10; 2006, c.19, Sched.L; 2006, c.35, Sched.C.
Governs collective bargaining regime for teachers in provincial schools for blind and deaf through the Provincial Schools Authority, consisting of members appointed by the Government

Sabrina's Law, 2005, c.7.
Requires school boards to have an anaphylactic policy.

School Trust Conveyances Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.S.3; 2002, c.17, Sched. F, Table.
Empowers interested persons to act as trustees for accepting conveyances of land for the purposes of establishing a school

Teachers' Pension Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.T.1 as amended by S.O. 1991, vol.2, c.52; S.O. 1993, c.39; S.O. 1998, c.34; 2005, c. 31, Sched. 21; 2006, c.33, Sched.Z.8; 2009, c. 18, Sch. 29; 2009, c. 34, Sch. V.
Continues the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan Board and provides for the governance and management of the pension plan for elementary and secondary school teachers and teachers in other designated institutions

Teachers' Pension Act, 1989, S.O. 1989, c.92; S.O. 1993, c.39; S.O. 1998, c.34
Schedule containing teachers' pension plan retained in force, but may be amended by partners.

Teaching Profession Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.T.2, amended 1991, vol.2, c.52; S.O. 1996, c.12; S.O. 1997, c.31; S.O. 2000, c.12; 2002, c.7; 2006, c.21, Sched.F.
Establishes the Ontario Teachers' Federation to promote interests of teachers and profession. Every teacher is a member. Board made up of teacher unions.

Upper Canada College Act, R.S.O. 1937, c.373; 1958, c.120; 2006, c. 10.
Governs Upper Canada College

Notes:

  1. Legislation of particular importance to the Ministry of Education administered by other ministries includes: Assessment Act, Municipal Elections Act, 1996, Municipal Act, 2001, Municipal Conflict of Interest Act, Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Municipal Property Assessment Corporation Act, 1997 and the Immunization of School Pupils Act.
  2. The list does not include all private Acts, which may be relevant to the Ministry of Education; nor does it include Acts that are purely amending Acts

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AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
Agencies, Boards and Commissions 2010/11 Expenditure Estimates 2009/10 Expenditure Interim Actuals 2008/09 Expenditure Actuals
Advisory Council on Special Education 75,000 75,000 52,558
Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO) 36,460,800 44,660,801 50,310,800
Education Quality and Accountability Office 32,084,100 32,734,100 32,708,837
Languages of Instruction Commission 13,500 477 12,521
Ontario Special Education Tribunals 355,520 355,500 368,429
Provincial Schools Authority 30,100 23,177 4,476
L'Office des télécommunications éducatives de langue française de l'Ontario (TFO) 15,000,000 17,630,000 20,600,000

Minister's Advisory Council on Special Education

The Minister's Advisory Council on Special Education advises the Minister of Education on any matter related to the establishment and provision of special education programs and services for exceptional students, including the identification and provision of early intervention programs for students with special education needs.

Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO)

TVO is governed by the Ontario Educational Communications Authority Act. TVO, as Ontario's publicly funded, educational media organization, provides high quality English-language educational programming and services through broadcast, distance education, and interactive web access. Distance education for elementary and secondary school credit is provided through the Independent Learning Centre. TVO's broadcast licence is governed by the federal Broadcasting Act and CRTC licensing.

The government is supporting TVO as it proceeds with conversion to digital broadcast as mandated by the CRTC. With TVO's renewed focus on its educational mandate, it continues to add new educational content to its programming to support Ontario's learners from pre-schoolers to adults through lifelong learning opportunities.

Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO)

EQAO is an independent agency responsible for ensuring greater accountability and enhancing of the quality of education in Ontario. This is achieved through the development and administration of large-scale student assessments and the public release of assessment findings together with recommendations for system improvement.

Languages of Instruction Commission of Ontario

The Languages of Instruction Commission of Ontario was established to help resolve disputes over the provision of education programs in the language of a French or English minority group. The commission intercedes in conflicts between school authorities and French-language rights holders groups.

Ontario Special Education Tribunals (English / French)

The Ontario Special Education Tribunals (both English and French) are independent adjudicative agencies that hear appeals of school board decisions relating to the identification of pupils as exceptional and/or the placement of such pupils in special education programs.

Provincial Schools Authority

The Provincial Schools Authority (PSA) was established in 1975 under the Provincial Schools Negotiations Act. The Act created a bargaining unit of all teachers employed in provincially operated schools. The PSA negotiates a collective agreement with the Provincial Schools Authority Teachers (PSAT) on behalf of the ministries of Education, and Community Safety and Correctional Services. The PSA is the employer of record for teachers, principals and vice-principals. It handles grievances, leaves and other administrative functions.

L'Office des télécommunications éducatives de langue française de l'Ontario (TFO)

For about 20 years, the Ontario French-language Educational Telecommunications Authority/ l'Office des télécommunications éducatives de langue française de l'Ontario (TFO) has provided broad-range educational and cultural programs and services that reflect the dynamic and rich nature of French-speaking Ontario. Until 2007, TFO operated as an associated business arm of the Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO). On April 1, 2007, the Ontario Government created TFO as an independent organization through an Order-in-Council (OIC), 363/2007. On July 25, 2008, TFO was confirmed as an independent agency through the Ontario French-language Educational Telecommunications Authority Act.

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Financial Information

The following chart depicts the ministry's investment in 2010/11 in activities that provide Ontario students with an excellent and accountable elementary/secondary education, so their futures and that of the Province will be characterized by continued prosperity, stability and growth. The ministry's budget supports the key government priority “Student Success”.


2010-11 Budget by Program - Operating - Chart

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2010-11 Budget by Program - Capital - Chart

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MINISTRY PLANNED EXPENDITURES 2010/11 ($M)
Operating 21,395.6
Capital 8,649.6
TOTAL * 30,045.2

* Note: Includes Statutory Appropriations but does not include consolidation adjustments. After consolidation adjustments (for agency and school board expense), the total 2010/11 planned expenditure is $21,888.7 million.

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OPERATING AND CAPITAL SUMMARY BY VOTE
Votes/Programs Estimates 2010-11
$
Change from Estimates 2009-10
$
% Estimates 2009-10*
$
Interim Actuals 2009-10*
$
Actuals 2008-09*
$
Operating and Capital Expense
Ministry Administration
25,792,500
326,700
1.3
25,465,800
25,774,300
25,097,721
Elementary and Secondary Education
29,482,895,300
8,927,626,700
43.4
20,555,268,600
20,457,935,000
19,537,424,591
Community Services I&IT Cluster
11,355,900
171,400
1.5
11,184,500
11,239,100
9,453,075
Less: Special Warrants
-
-
-
-
-
Total Operating and Capital Expense to be Voted
29,520,043,700
8,928,124,800
43.4
20,591,918,900
20,494,948,400
19,571,975,387
Special Warrants
-
-
-
-
-
Statutory Appropriations
525,195,987
266,115,973
102.7
259,080,014
255,080,000
50,118,019
Ministry Total Operating & Capital Expense
30,045,239,687
9,194,240,773
44.1
20,850,998,914
20,750,028,400
19,622,093,406
Consolidation & Other Adjustments
(8,156,492,100)
(8,248,410,200)
(8,973.7)
91,918,100
141,380,600
54,468,996
Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments
21,888,747,587
945,830,573
4.5
20,942,917,014
20,891,409,000
19,676,562,402
Operating and Capital Assets
Elementary and Secondary Education
745,000
395,000
112.9
350,000
750,000
-
Less: Special Warrants
-
-
-
-
-
Total Operating and Capital Assets to be Voted
745,000
395,000
112.9
350,000
750,000
-
Special Warrants
-
-
-
-
-
Statutory Appropriations
-
-
-
-
-
Total Assets
745,000
395,000
112.9
350,000
750,000
-

* Estimates for the previous fiscal year are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2010 Ontario Budget.

Note: Commencing in 2009-10, the Province's minor Tangible Capital Assets (mTCA) are capitalized on a prospective basis. Direct comparison between 2010-11, 2009-10, and 2008-09 may not be meaningful.


2010-11 Ministry Investments (Operating & Capital)

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Appendix: Ministry of Education

2009/10 Annual Report

The Ministry of Education seeks to establish and maintain a high quality and sustainable publicly funded education system focused on the goals of high levels of student achievement, reduced gaps in student achievement and high levels of public confidence.
Initiatives undertaken in fiscal year 2009/10 to help the ministry achieve these goals include:

Elementary Students

  • Supporting Student Achievement Officers who work with elementary principals and teachers to improve student learning and achievement in reading, writing and math.
  • Providing funding in May 2009 for over one million books and resources for elementary school libraries. Combined with books purchased through an investment in February 2009, this initiative resulted in more than two million new books in elementary school libraries.
  • Supporting over 1,000 elementary schools, where less than 75 per cent of students have not yet met the provincial standard, through the Ontario Focused Intervention Partnership and Schools in the Middle initiatives. These initiatives provide funding for professional learning about reading, writing and mathematics for teams of teachers and principals.
  • Identifying an additional 35 Schools on the Move. This program encourages elementary schools to network within and across schools and to share successful teaching strategies in reading, writing and math.
  • Expanding classroom-based professional learning through inquiry, using student work to improve teaching and learning in reading, writing and math. (Collaborative Learning in Mathematics [CIL-M], Kindergarten-Grade 1 Collaborative Inquiry, Student Work Study.)
  • Preparing for the September 2010 implementation of full-day learning for four- and five-year-olds, including announcing the program model, introducing legislation, developing a draft Full-Day Early Learning-Kindergarten Program document, and providing preliminary series of workshops for the principals that will be supporting children and their families at approximately 600 schools across the province.

Secondary Students

  • Expanding the Specialist High Skills Major program from 153 to over 430 schools and adding two new majors in Energy and Aviation and Aerospace.
  • Getting more students engaged in their learning by supporting 1,900 student-led projects in almost 900 schools, and holding regional students forums, including five online forums held concurrently (Thunder Bay, Sudbury, Ottawa, London, Toronto) through Adobe Connect to hear from students on how to improve the education system.
  • Continuing the Minister's Student Advisory Council for its second year to gain student feedback on changes in the education system, including input about curriculum under review.
  • Providing school based-mentoring programs through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada to 2,000 more “at risk” students, than the previous year.
  • Increasing the instructional knowledge and skills of Grades 7 to12 educators to meet the diverse needs of all students through the Differentiated Instruction Professional Learning Strategy and maintaining a focus on assessment and evaluation based on essential understandings outlined in the Ontario curriculum.
  • Continuing to support the work of Student Success School and Cross Panel teams in tracking and monitoring individual student progress from Grade 9 to the completion of diploma requirements by:
    • providing supports and interventions to assist students in completing graduation requirements;
    • enhancing the Transition Planning and Implementation Initiative intended to support the individual needs of students as they move from elementary school to secondary school;
    • and assisting secondary schools in creating a welcoming and caring environment for Grade 9 students.
  • Continuing the Student Success School Support Initiative to provide direct support to principals from 67 schools in 12 boards across the province. These boards have been selected based on data indicating a significant number of students who may not be on track to graduate.

Safe/Healthy Schools

  • Announcing the School Food and Beverage Policy, which provides nutrition standards for all food and beverages sold in secondary schools. Although the announcement occurred in January 2010, the policy becomes mandatory for all schools in September 2011.
  • Successful training of over 440 staff from school board teams and public health on the School Food and Beverage Policy.
  • The Ministry provides $10 million in annual funding to 34 high schools situated in urban neighbourhoods that face challenges such as poverty, criminal and gang activity, lack of community resources and student achievement issues.
  • Challenging Ontario students to do one more thing to make their school healthier as part of the Healthy Schools Recognition Program.
  • Introduced the Keeping Our Kids Safe At School Act, which went into effect on February 1, 2010. The Act requires school staff to report serious student incidents, such as bullying, to the principal. It also requires that principals contact the parents of the victims. In addition, staff that work directly with students, must respond to all cases of disrespectful and inappropriate student behaviour, as well as those which can lead to suspension or expulsion, as long at it is safe to do so.
  • The Ministry provided $34.2 million in annual funding to school boards to operate programs for expelled and long-term suspended students and to acquire additional para-professional resources to work with at-risk students.
  • The Ministry provided training and resources to boards teams on October 20 and 21, 2009 on the new safe schools legislative requirements; related regulations and policy requirements relating to revised Policy and Program Memoranda 144 (Bullying Prevention and Intervention) and 145 (Progressive Discipline and Promoting Positive Student Behaviour). In addition, school board teams provided training to school teams on these requirements.
  • Invested $1 million annually with Kids Help Phone to provide a bullying prevention hotline 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Providing more funding to the Community Use of Schools program to help cover the costs of inflation, ensuring that school space for after-school activities continues to be affordable for not-for-profit groups.

Supporting Educators

  • Recognizing 20 educators and support staff with Premier's Awards for Teaching Excellence for their contributions to student learning and achievement.
  • Supporting the growth and professional development of approximately 6,000 new teachers each year through the New Teacher Induction Program.
  • Providing summer learning opportunities in literacy and mathematics for thousands of teachers across the province, through their boards.
  • Two PA days devoted to special education and closing the gaps were supported with resources.
  • Meeting our funding commitments to support four more years of labour peace and stability in our schools with increased salaries and benefits for all staff.
  • Ontario Skills Passport, which is a bilingual, web-based resource that supports and recognizes learners' and job seekers' acquisition and demonstration of essential skills and work habits in the classroom,  launched new resources and tools including “A Guide to Linking Essential Skills and the Curriculum.”
  • Providing opportunities to approximately 375 experienced teachers annually to expand their knowledge and skill base and share exemplary practices with other teachers through the Teacher Learning and Leadership Program.
  • The Ontario Leadership Strategy was launched in fall 2008 to support student achievement by attracting the right people to the principalship and developing them throughout their career.
  • In the 2009/10 fiscal year boards were provided with a $3 million one-time grant to begin or take further action to put Succession Planning and Talent Development (SPTD) plans in place. SPTD includes a continuum of supports including mentoring and Principal/Vice-Principal Performance Appraisal.
  • Boards were provided with $4 million in funding over the school year to continue with the implementation of mentoring for newly appointed school leaders. Approximately 3,986 principals and vice-principals participated in mentoring, including 2,190 mentees and 1,796 mentors. Support for mentoring of newly appointed Supervisory Officers and Directors of Education was also provided. Approximately 194 Supervisory Officers and Directors participated in mentoring, including 96 mentees and 98 mentors.
  • Boards were invited to implement Principal Performance Appraisal as part of the Ontario Leadership Strategy. The Principal/Vice-Principal Performance Appraisal Guideline, (Version 3), was released to boards in August, 2009. Funding was provided to 68 boards (that expressed interest) to support the implementation of PPA on a voluntary basis
  • Continuing to advance student achievement with ongoing support for teachers, education assistants, principals, vice-principals, education support professionals, para-professionals, office support workers, custodians, board administrators and other board staff in the education sector.
  • Expanding the Student Success Differentiated Instruction Project sites from 12 to 24 this year to ensure secondary and elementary school pairings in each region. Teacher teams have contributed to the creation of new classroom-ready resources written by, and for, teachers.
  • Embedding literacy instruction across the curriculum and focusing support on instructional practices in mathematics though job-embedded professional learning and the support of provincial-level coaches working with Grade 7 to12 educators across the province.
  • Supporting French-Language secondary schools teachers with their understanding of the academic problems of students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and of the issues faced by these students as they transition from secondary to postsecondary school through training.
  • In October and November, 2009 all secondary principals, supervisory officers, student success leaders and representative numbers of elementary principals were invited to participate in one of 11 regional professional learning sessions held across the province. These one-day professional learning session consisted of informative and interactive discussions that included: a presentation of board and provincial data, a review of Student Success initiatives and programs, a “walk through” of new resources and current supports.
  • Held six one-day regional sessions in fall 2009 to share information about board French as a Second Language projects that were funded over the last three years under the Official Languages in Education Program. These sessions allowed board representatives to present their achievements, products and success stories.
  • To date, more than 13,000 educators have been prepared to support Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) in our publicly funded schools. School boards have reported that they are providing special education programs and services to more than 10,000 students with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
  • An evaluation report on implementation of Shared Solutions: A Guide to Preventing and Resolving Conflicts Regarding Programs and Services for Students with Special Education Needs was received in December 2009.
  • Addressed concerns of giving more time and resources to support teachers in implementing revised curricula. The next curriculum review is set for 2012.
  • Facilitated policy and regulatory changes to ensure that Ontario is in compliance with the new Ontario Labour Mobility Act, 2009. As of December 2009, teachers from all other Canadian jurisdictions can be automatically certified to teach in Ontario.
  • In 2009-10, many new print and multimedia resources were produced to provide support for the Literacy and Numeracy and Student Success initiatives and to increase accessibility to current research. Examples include:
    • Multimedia resources –Supports for Boys' Literacy CD-ROM, Student-led Conferences, Student Success Differentiated Instruction Educator's Package (2010)
    • What Works: Research into Practice monographs – Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective Factors, Science and Literacy in the Elementary Classroom
    • Capacity-Building Series monographs – Reading Fluency: Building Capacity for Comprehension
  • Over 100 English-language online courses are now available to school boards (Public and Catholic versions). Teachers and students can access over 19,000 online resources in the Ontario Educational Resources Bank.
  • Provided regional training to board teams for implementation of the revised elementary Health and Physical Education curriculum in partnership with the Ministry of Health Promotion and other stakeholders.
  • The ministry provided $10 million (FY 2009-10) to school boards for the continued implementation of the MISA Local Capacity Building initiative that enables boards to better manage their information to inform board decisions, school administration, and classroom practice. All school boards have MISA Leaders who champion the use of evidence and data throughout their boards and work closely with senior administrators, principals, Student Success Leaders and School Effectiveness Leads to help ensure that data is used effectively for improved student outcomes.
  • Seven – one provincial French-Language and six regional – MISA Professional Network Centres continued to support the efforts of individual boards by collaborating on: professional learning for administrators, principals, and teachers; development of resources for professional learning; research and evaluation capacity building; and, sharing effective practices in order to improve student outcomes.

Key Investments

  • Since 2006, we have invested $52 million (2006 to 2009-10), through targeted funding outside the Grants for Student Needs to build capacity and improve the learning environment for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Of that $52 million, nearly $28 million has been allocated for training.
  • Provided additional funding to the Canadian Hearing Society to accommodate more school boards in participating in the Barrier-Free Education initiatives.
  • Invested $1.2 billion in Ontario's French-language schools in 2009-10, an increase of $51M over the previous year. Under this government, annual funding for French-language boards has increased by about $430 million – $5,129 more per student, an increase of over 55%.
  • Provided additional funding ($1 million in 2009-10) to VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children to provide an Auditory Verbal Training and Mentorship Program in school boards.

Other Education Initiatives

  • Responding to recommendations of the Governance Review Committee, the government passed the Student Achievement and School Board Governance Act. The legislation clarifies the duties of trustees and the directors of education, provides authority for the regulation of trustee codes of conduct, audit committee and parent involvement committees and requires boards to develop and implement strategic plans which have has their goal student achievement and well being.
  • The government filed the Provincial Interest Regulation on February 26, 2010 to establish a process for the Minister of Education to work with a school board to address serious and persistent concerns relating to student achievement, student health and safety, school board governance or parent involvement.
  • Continuing to repair, rebuild and expand hundreds of schools through the $4.8 billion Good Places to Learn initiative.
  • Piloting a variety of innovative green products and technologies in over 150 Ontario schools through the Green Schools Pilot Initiative.
  • Over 2,300 schools are benefiting from the $550 million two-year program to make schools more energy efficient.
  • The Focus on Youth program was expanded to include priority neighbourhoods in Windsor in addition to priority neighbourhoods in Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa. The program allows community partners to provide opportunities for young people to be engaged in positive summer activities in safe and supportive environments.
  • 150 Priority Schools from 27 school boards in Ontario offer school space at no charge to not-for-profit groups. Each Priority School received $34,000 for custodial and related costs outside of school hours. The overall investment for Priority Schools in 2009-10 was $5.1 million. Priority Schools are a part of the Community Use of Schools initiative, which in the school year 2009-10 received $38.5 million in funding.
  • In 2009-10, the Ministry invested an additional $1 million to open 21 more Parenting and Family Literacy Centres (PFLCs). The overall investment for PFLCs is $9 million annually which supports 144 centres across the province.
  • In 2009-10, the Ministry put forth $3 million for the Student Support Leadership initiative which went toward fostering leadership within and across 29 clusters of school boards/authorities and children and youth mental health agencies to form and enhance local partnerships and coordinate services between schools and agencies.
  • Supporting over 1,600 projects to enhance parent engagement at the local, regional and provincial levels through Parents Reaching Out Grants, totalling $2.28 million.
  • Launching the School Information Finder, a web-based tool that allows the public and parents to search for and learn more about all publicly funded schools.
  • Expanded access to Homework Help (a free, confidential, real-time math tutoring service with certified Ontario teachers and additional math resources) to 15 school boards.
  • Provincewide implementation of the Connections for Students model supporting children transitioning from intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) therapy services provided by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) funded Autism Intervention Program (AIP) to applied behaviour analysis (ABA) instructional methods in publicly funded schools beginning March 2010.
  • Addition of school board level personnel with Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) expertise.
  • Provincial Initiative on Assessing Achievement in Alternative Areas (A4) was implemented during the 2009-10 school year. It included regional projects to enhance assessment processes for students with special education needs who do not access the Ontario curriculum and do not participate in EQAO assessments.
  • Curriculum Council addressed concerns of overcrowded curriculum and submitted 11 key recommendations to the minister.
  • Curriculum Council began consideration of financial literacy in the existing Ontario curriculum, grades 4 to 12 and will provide a report to the Minister later in 2010.
  • Work is being done to raise the bar and close the achievement gap for all students. In Spring 2010, the ministry released Growing Success: assessment, evaluation and reporting: improving student learning.
  • Amalgamated 20 small school authorities into existing district school boards to give staff and students greater access to tools and resources to improve student achievement.
  • Conducted three OnSIS Data Think Tank sessions to discuss ways of tracking how adult and continuing education supports student success and research demographics of 16 to 20 year olds and adults 21 and over who earn credits through continuing education.
  • To improve accountability and transparency of school boards, the Ministry has introduced amendments to the financial accountability sections of the Education Act in Bill 218 which received Royal Assent in December 2009. As a result, the Ministry has implemented significant changes to the budget compliance measures and financial reports of school boards for school year 2010-11 to better reflect boards' financial position.
  • The Ministry has also introduced amendments to the Education Act in Bill 177, which was passed into law in December 2009, to strengthen governance of school boards. In school year 2010-11, school boards will be establishing audit committees with external member representation. Internal audit functions will be implemented to improve risk management functions in the sector and to support audit committees. Bill 177 had also introduced changes to borrowing and investment powers of school boards to enhance sound financial management practices throughout the sector.
  • Provided regional leadership for implementing the Environmental Education Policy Framework in boards and schools, including the development or review of board environmental education policies.
  • Continuing to develop resources to support equity and diversity in the curriculum, including strategies that enhance aboriginal perspectives in the curriculum in partnership with the Aboriginal Education Office.
  • Blended learning was successfully piloted in 16 district school boards across Ontario.
  • Funded pilot projects that focus on the effective use of evidence to inform classroom practice and increase student achievement through Managing Information for Student Achievement (MISA) Professional Network Centres to expand and strengthen research and evaluation capacity throughout the province.
  • The 2010 Ontario Education Research Symposium brought together approximately 400 educators, researchers and policy makers to share knowledge about how research and evidence informs classroom practice.
  • Began the review of the following curriculum subjects in 2009-10:
    • Grades 9 to 12, Native Studies
    • Grades 1 to 12, Native Languages
    • Grades 9 to 12, Classical Studies and International Languages
    • Grades 11 to 12, Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Grades 1 to 8 , Social Studies/History/Geography
    • Grades 9 to 12, Canadian & World Studies
  • Revised curriculum policy documents for mandatory implementation beginning September 2009:
    • Grades 10 to 12, Computer Studies
    • Grades 9 to 10, Science
    • Grades 11 to 12, Science
    • Grades 9 and 10, Technological Education
    • Grades 11 and 12, Technological Education
    • Grades 1 to 8, The Arts
  • Released revised curriculum policy documents for mandatory implementation beginning in September 2010:
    • Grades 1 to 8, Health and Physical Education (interim)

 

  • Training completed for the revised curriculum policy document for mandatory implementation beginning in September 2010:
    • Grades 9 to 12, The Arts
  • Ongoing revision for the following revised curriculum policy documents:
    • Grades 1 to 12, French as a Second Language (Immersion)
    • Grades 4 to 12, French as a Second Language (Core)
    • Grades 9 to 12, Health and Physical Education (interim)
    • Grades 9 to 12, Social Sciences and Humanities

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Ministry Expenditures

  Ministry Actual Expenditures ($M) 2009/10
Operating
*20,525.7
Capital
224.4
Staff Strength (as of March 31, 2010)
**1788

*Note: : *Includes Statutory Appropriations, Bad Debt expense, and reconciliation adjustments but does not include consolidation adjustments. This number is based on Interim Actuals, and final actual expenditures will be stated in 2009/10 Public Accounts.
** This number excludes seasonal staff, students, and employees on leave.

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